Response to Wired Blog on Facebook Connect

Some of you may have seen Michael Calore’s recent post about Facebook Connect.

As John McCrea says, the OpenID community is learning from Facebook as well as website operators and end users. In fact, Facebook has been very generous in sharing its user experience (UX) feedback as evidenced by its recent participation in the OpenID UX Summit hosted by Yahoo. Many of the findings were published for review and comment, we look forward to ongoing feedback.

Additionally, a few months ago, the BBC and JanRain organized and hosted an OpenID Foundation Content Provider Advisory Committee meeting in NYC

The OpenID Foundation has also formed a Customer Research Committee to more fully understand market needs as presented at Internet Identity World a few weeks ago.

Another area where the market has requested additional OpenID capabilities has been customer profile data, which has recently been addressed by Yahoo, AOL, and Google.

While it is true that Facebook has done a lot of great pioneering work with user experience and data management, the open source community has been systematically working to enhance and extend the functionality and intuitiveness of OpenID, Open Social, OAuth, Portable Contacts, hCards, etc. Google’s work with the LSO user interface and JanRain’s work with the RPX user interface are examples of approaches aimed at improving the ease of use of OpenID.

One major advantage for website operators of deploying open source approaches like OpenID and Oauth, is that they don’t need to keep up with multiple evolving proprietary platforms and data formats. By implementing support for OpenID, website operators get the benefits of registration and login from AOL, Google, and Yahoo today, plus MySpace and Microsoft LiveID in the near future. Additionally, depending on your deployment approach, you can support both proprietary standards like Facebook Connect and OpenID with one integrated user interface as with JanRain’s RPX.